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Tag Archives: Scam Alert

Scam Alert: “Job Offer” Email

alarm

I received the following email today offering me a cushy sounding job. Too bad it’s a fake check scam. I’ve posted the entire email below with my comments in red so you can learn to what to watch for if you get a letter similar to this. Please heed the advice in today’s post. A failure to do so could cost you thousands of dollars and may land you jail.

 

Greetings, (I’m being offered a job, but the company doesn’t know my name!)

It is my pleasure to write you in respect of Polesworth Art Gallery, Dublin, Ireland. (A Google search doesn’t find a Polesworth Art Gallery in Dublin, Ireland). We produce and export high quality textile materials, fine art prints, posters, framed arts and gift items.

We are seeking a reliable and trustworthy representative who can help us establish a medium of getting to our customers in USA & CANADA. You shall be receiving all forms of payment on our behalf from our customers being our representative. It does not affect your present job, it’s strictly online job and absolutely legal. You shall have ten percent commission on every payment made through you as your remuneration. You could make over 2500 U.S dollars weekly depending on your response to the job.

JOB DESCRIPTION:

1. Receive payment from customers
2. Process Payments
3. Deduct 10% which will be your commission/pay on Payment processed.
4. Forward balance after deduction of percentage/pay to any of the offices you will be contacted to send payment to  (This is the big red flag. First, what company, any where in the world can’t get a merchant account or PayPal to process payments from around the world? Second, it’s asking you to use your personal bank account to help it do business. NEVER, EVER AGREE TO THAT!)

If you are interested, please furnish us with the following details below:

1. FULL NAMES. ” as it is to be stated in every payment issued to you
On our behalf”……………………..
2. RESIDENTIAL ADDRESS”Where payments will be delivered to”……………….
…….
3. CITY………..
4. STATE:..
5. ZIP CODE:…
6. COUNTY:….
7. PHONE NUMBERS:..
8. GENDER…..(There is no need for this.)
9. AGE…..(There is no need for this.)
10. OCCUPATION:….
11. ARE YOU EMPLOYED?…
12. HAVE YOU EVER BEEN CONVICTED OF VIOLATING ANY LAW OTHER THAN A MINOR
TRAFFIC VIOLATION?
13. IF YES, EXPLAIN CIRCUMSTANCES:
14. HAVE YOU EVER WORKED AS A REPRESENTATIVE BEFORE?
15. IF YES, EXPLAIN CIRCUMSTANCES:……
16. ALTERNATIVE EMAIL ADDRESS:…..

Please visit our website: (No website was given.)

We are grateful for your attention. Your email was forwarded by monster.com at our request, because you or somebody else has subscribed for the delivery of the job offers on the Internet. (I don’t use this email with Monster.com and Monter.com isn’t going to  forward emails to businesses. However, if you have a Monster.com, you’ll want to be careful getting contacted through your profile.)

If you are interested, please get back to me as soon as possible.We wish you good luck and happiness.

Friendly Regards,

If you no longer wish to receive information regarding this Job offer, please reply to this message with the word “Unsubscribe” in the subject line (Don’t email asking to be removed, as it will only prove the letter arrived at a real email account. Delete it). 

 

Leslie Comments:

Phishing scams involve a “company” sending you a large sum of money of which you get to keep 10% for your compensation. You are asked the send the extra back to another “company” usually in another country, though not always. This scam doesn’t just show up for work-at-home jobs. I’ve heard stories about people selling items on eBay or renting an apartment in which someone sends too much money and asks the extra (usually several thousand dollars) to be sent to someone else. If you fall for this scam, the original check or deposit (if electronic) you received will turn out to be bogus and you’ll be held accountable for all the money you forwarded on. If you can’t cover the amount, you may lose your banking privileges. In some case, you can get arrested for participating in a fake check scam.

Remember, no legitimate business needs to use people’s personal bank account to do business.



Note: Work-At-Home Success contains advertising as well as screened work-at-home jobs and resources. Some posts may contain affiliate links, which means I may receive compensation if you register or buy using the link. Occasionally, WAHS publishes "Supporting Contributor" posts or paid reviews for which compensation is paid. These posts are marked as such. All opinions are my own. Click here for full details and disclosures.




Is It a Legit Job or a Scam?

question the answer

The growth of telecommunications as well as a desire to cut costs while retaining valuable employees has contributed to the expansion of telecommuting. These numbers give credence to the idea that families can balance work and family by earning an income from home.

However, finding a telecommuting job is not an easy task. Scam artists with their ads for easy money licking envelopes have created an illusion that work-at-home jobs are abundant and all that one needs to do is sign up. Work-at-home wannabes waste a fortune in money looking for “THE LIST’ containing the legitimate work-at-home companies. So while millions of Americans work at home, millions more still lose money to work-at-home scams.

When looking for work-at-home jobs, here are four tips to keep in mind to evaluate their legitimacy:

1.  NEVER send money for a work-at-home job. I have seen many ads that tell you the money is to process your application or cover expenses. It’s nonsense. You would think your boss was nuts if he charged to put you on payroll or for paperclips. I have even seen an online scam, which says they know you are too smart to fall for the old “fee is to cover expenses”. Instead, they charge you to maintain the servers and website. That’s bogus too! Look at all the affiliate programs that don’t charge you anything so that you can market their products and earn income. And then there are the programs in which you have to pay them so you can place their ads and earn a commission if someone responds. Again, if you want to waste your time placing free ads, join a free affiliate program instead. If you only remember one rule of thumb about work-at-home jobs, remember this: Never, ever, send money for a work-at-home job.

2.  Beware of jobs from companies with websites posted on free hosting sites. We are talking about jobs not home businesses in this case. While a home business person may promote their opportunity on a free domain, a company that is offering employment should have a website with its own domain. Any company that cannot afford to pay for web hosting or a domain can’t afford to hire you. Websites on WordPress.com (i.e. company.wordpress.com), Blogger (i.e. company.blogspot.com), Weebly (i.e. company.weebly.com) or any other site in which the company name isn’t the main domain name should be suspect.

3.  Beware of email address from commercial or free accounts. Commercial accounts are those such as AOL or MSN. The free accounts are Yahoo or Hotmail. The only exception is Gmail, which is used by many professional solo-preneurs who hire help for their businesses. I have also worked for a few people who had AOL accounts, although this is less and less. In those cases, I knew the businesses personally, so I knew it was legit. The use of a free or commercial account is often used by scammers and biz op promoters because they’re easy to dump. So while a commercial or free account doesn’t automatically mean it’s a scam, it should be a clue to proceed with caution.

4.  When searching your local classified ads, work-at-home opportunities with an 800# are not usually legitimate jobs. Local companies don’t use 800#’s in their ads. If you are temped  anyway and call, you will usually be asked for money, which if you remember rule #1, is a sure sign it’s not a job. These ads usually sell overpriced work-at-home books or schemes.

Most people I talk to about finding a work-at-home fail to understand that work-at-home jobs are like any other job. Companies don’t pay people to sit home and stuff envelopes, glue earrings, or send email. They are looking for qualified employees to fill a specific position. When searching for work, stick to job search sites, focus on your skills and experience, and remember the five rules of sniffing out the real jobs from the schemes.

Be sure to read Work-At-Home Success’ Scam Page for more information on protecting yourself. You can also check recent alerts to see new scams to avoid.



Note: Work-At-Home Success contains advertising as well as screened work-at-home jobs and resources. Some posts may contain affiliate links, which means I may receive compensation if you register or buy using the link. Occasionally, WAHS publishes "Supporting Contributor" posts or paid reviews for which compensation is paid. These posts are marked as such. All opinions are my own. Click here for full details and disclosures.