Note: Work-At-Home Success contains advertising as well as screened work-at-home jobs and resources. Click here for full details and disclosures.

Category Archives: Scam Alert

How to Research a Work-At-Home Job

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One of the most challenging tasks to getting a work-at-home job is determining whether or not the job announcements you’re finding are legitimate. The free job boards and many websites are filled with offers of high paying jobs that turn out to be duds or scams. The first step to any successful work-at-home job search is to weed out the good offers from the bad. Here are some tips to researching work-at-home jobs.

Keep Your Emotions in Check: One of the most important things you can do to avoid work-at-home scams is to not let your emotions get involved. Scammers are brilliant copywriters who are able to use their offers to get you excited about the prospect of paying off debt, being home with children or making tons of money in a short time. They do this because they know buying decisions are made emotionally. Therefore, keep your head in the game. Legitimate jobs don’t use hype or promise you the moon because they’re not selling anything.

Go through the scam check list: If the job asks for money to hire you or wants to sell you its own equipment or software, it’s not a job. Other scams to watch out for include envelope stuffing, assembly work, payment processing, any job asking you to use your bank account to help the company do business, email processing, rebate processing, repackaging, and any offer that uses the word “guarantee” in relation to income. Employers don’t offer guarantees; they offer a salary or a wage.

Read the job description: If you get to the end of the job announcement and you don’t know what the job entails, it’s likely not a job. Work-at-home job announcements are like traditional job announcements in which the employer gives the job title and description, a list of requirements, and instructions on how to apply.

Do your research:  Visit the company’s website, which should not be hosted on a free site (i.e. company.freehost.com). It should also be professional looking with easy to find contact information. Use a search engine to find information about the company. Type in the company’s name along with the word ‘scam’ to see if anything pops up. Visit quality work-at-home or scam forums to see if anyone has shared experiences with the company.  You can check the Better Business Bureau to see if there is any negative feedback and if so how the company responded. However, not all companies are in the Better Business Bureau and not being a member doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a scam.

Proceed through the application process with caution: Sometimes scams don’t reveal themselves until you’ve started the application process. So take each step with care. Don’t give your social security or other information that can be used to steal your identity during the hiring process (employers will eventually need your social security number, but not until they actually hire you). If you’re asked for money for anything besides a criminal history check, walk away. You should never have to give payment information for a job. Work at home jobs are just like traditional jobs, so if during your job search process you’re asked to do or provide something a traditional employer wouldn’t ask for, stop the process and assess.

Work-at-home jobs are prevalent, but so are the scams and schemes used to trick you out of your money. Protect yourself and stay focused on finding legitimate jobs by taking time to research and evaluate job announcements.



Note: Work-At-Home Success contains advertising as well as screened work-at-home jobs and resources. Some posts may contain affiliate links, which means I may receive compensation if you register or buy using the link. Occasionally, WAHS publishes "Supporting Contributor" posts or paid reviews for which compensation is paid. These posts are marked as such. All opinions are my own. Click here for full details and disclosures.




How to Cancel or Get a Refund from Online Merchants

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Every now and then I get an email from someone asking about a purchase they made from an advertiser on Work-At-Home Success. I always want to help you if you have any problems with an advertiser, but getting email like this suggests to me that some people are buying things online and not saving their receipts or otherwise documenting information about the merchant. This becomes a problem if you want a refund or to cancel your order, because unless someone can give me the name of the merchant, it’s difficult for me to provide information on how to contact the company. Here are tips to organizing your orders or finding who to contact if you have an order issue.

1) Always note the website from which you make your order. You may find the ad on Work-At-Home Success (or another website), but you’ll be taken to a different website to get information and make your order. Bookmark, clip to Evernote or write down the URL of the site in case you need to return to it.

2) Save and file your emailed receipt. These can clutter up the inbox, so create a folder titled “Receipts” or “Business Receipts” and file your email receipts there. Receipts usually have company contact info as well as order or transaction numbers that are important when you need help.

If you’ve made an order, but can’t find your receipt and didn’t note the merchant, things get a little bit harder, but not impossible.

1) If you used PayPal to pay for your order, log into your account for a receipt.

2) If you purchased using a debit or credit card, contact your bank or credit card company for information on the transaction.

In both of the above cases, you should be able to use this information to discover the name of the merchant and details that can allow you to get help.

If you feel you’re a victim of a scam, contact your payment processor (PayPal, bank or credit card company), and ask for a fraud investigation. In some cases, you can get your money back. You can also notify them that you don’t want further payments made (this may require closing the account and opening a new one).

The best way to stay sane and safe online, is by paying attention to the merchants you buy from and saving your receipts. You can always contact Work-At-Home Success if you found the resource through the site, but again, without product or merchant information, it will be difficult for me to direct you to the right resource.



Note: Work-At-Home Success contains advertising as well as screened work-at-home jobs and resources. Some posts may contain affiliate links, which means I may receive compensation if you register or buy using the link. Occasionally, WAHS publishes "Supporting Contributor" posts or paid reviews for which compensation is paid. These posts are marked as such. All opinions are my own. Click here for full details and disclosures.